Assault & Other Violent Offences 2018

R. v. D.A., 2018

The client was charged with communications harassment and failing to comply with a protection order. Initially the crown was not agreeable to resolving the matter in a manner that would leave my client without a criminal record. However, upon further discussions with the crown, they agreed to withdraw the charge and allow the client to enter into a one-year peace bond.

R. v. B.C., 2018

The client was charged with assaulting a peace officer and two counts of failing to comply. I worked hard to ensure that this client was not left with a conviction as where were definite extenuating circumstances that led to the allegations. After reviewing the disclosure, I set up a meeting with the crown and advised them of the concerns I had regarding the extenuating circumstances. In the end, the crown agreed, and all charges were withdrawn on the first court appearance.

R. v. K.E., 2018

The client was charged with assault against their domestic partner. The client completed counselling under my direction, and upon that completion the crown agreed to withdraw the charge.

R. v. A.M., 2018

The client was charged with assault with a weapon and uttering threats. At the first court date, I spoke with the crown regarding how this had been a mutual altercation and it was not in the public interest to prosecute the file. The crown agreed and withdrew the charges against the client. No criminal record or further court appearances were required.

R. v. R.M., 2018

The client was charged with domestic assault. I worked with the client to ensure that when I met with the crown to discuss resolution, I had enough to work with to ensure that the crown would consider withdrawing the charges. The crown did agree to withdraw the charges once counseling was completed.

R. v. C.K., 2018

The client was charged with assault with a weapon, assault, mischief to property, failing to comply with an undertaking, two counts of failing to comply, and failing to comply with a provision of a protection order. The client pleaded guilty to assault with a weapon, failing to comply with an undertaking and failing to comply with a provision of a protection order. The crown was initially seeking a term of incarceration, however, upon negotiating with the crown, I was able to convince them to agree to a term of probation. This took into account a prior related record.

R. v. M.O., 2018

The client was charged with assault. I worked closely with the client to address underlying issues surrounding the allegation. With that, I was able to have the client’s charge dropped/withdrawn.

R. v. J.S., 2018

The client was charged with two counts of assault. The allegations were against the client’s domestic partner. With my direction and advice, the client began counselling and treatment. I was able to have the crown agree to an informal resolution so that the charges were dropped.

R. v. M.J., 2018

The client was charged with assault and mischief. After discussions with the crown, they agreed to withdraw the charge and allow the client to enter into a one-year peace bond.

R. v. M.P., 2018

The client was charged with assault against their domestic partner. Both parties were alleged to have been intoxicated. It was clear that the crown would have had issues with establishing a conviction against the client. I approached the crown, and, in the end, the charge was dropped outright. This left my client without a conviction or criminal record.

R. v. T.S., 2018

The client was charged with assault causing bodily harm in relation to a serious allegation of domestic abuse. It was clear from my review of the disclosure that the allegations were unfounded. I always make a point of ensuring I review the disclosure thoroughly, so that I can give my client’s the best advice possible. I worked diligently to ensure that the best possible outcome was achieved for my client. In the end, the charges were withdrawn outright. No criminal record/no conviction.

R. v. T.G., 2018

The client was charged with assault with a weapon and common assault. The allegations were serious. Once I had reviewed the disclosure, I approached the crown to discuss resolution of the matter. After discussions with the crown, they agreed to withdraw the charge and allow the client to enter into a one-year peace bond. The client was left without a criminal conviction.

R. v. R.D., 2018

The client was charged with assault. I received a copy of the crown’s disclosure (evidence against my client). I reviewed the same, and quickly came to the realization that there was no basis for the allegation against my client. I booked a meeting with the prosecutor to discuss the file. The crown agreed that there was no reasonable likelihood of conviction and the charge was dropped so the client was left with no criminal record.

R. v. D.T., 2018

The client was charged with assault, mischief, and failing to remain at the scene of an accident. The allegations were serious and arose in a domestic situation. I approached the crown with respect to resolution of the matter, and after much negotiating, the crown ultimately agreed to stay the charge.

R. v. H.K., 2018

The client was charged with assault. The allegation was that the client had assaulted their domestic partner. There were serious ramifications that resulted from the allegation in relation to custody and access to the couple’s child. I was able to have the client’s conditions changed from the conditions imposed at the bail hearing prior to being retained. The client was then able to communicate with his wife and to see his child. Ultimately, I had the client complete some counselling, and the crown withdrew the charge.

R. v. R.P., 2018

The client was charged with assault in the context of a domestic violence allegation. Very early on, I had the client complete some tasks which assisted me in negotiating for a resolution that would leave my client without a criminal record. A conviction would have resulted in my client having issues with future employment. Once the client completed tasks I had requested of him, I approached the crown to have the charges withdrawn. The crown withdrew (dropped) the charges and the client was left without a conviction or criminal record.

R. v. Z.R, 2018

The client was charged with assault involving an altercation at a restaurant. The charge was serious. I met with the crown to negotiate a resolution of the matter, after having reviewed the file and concluding that there were likely issues with the crown’s ability to prove that this wasn’t just a consensual fight. The crown agreed that there was in fact no reasonable likelihood of conviction, and the charge was withdrawn on the client’s first court date. The client avoided a conviction which would have compromised their employment.

R. v. R.K., 2018

The client was charged with assault and forcible confinement in the context of a domestic situation. I had reviewed the crown’s disclosure and met with the crown to discuss resolving the matter by way of a withdrawal of the charge on the basis that there was no reasonable likelihood of conviction. The crown agreed, and on the second court date I had the charge withdrawn.

R. v. S.B., 2018

The client was charged with assaulting a police officer after a cause disturbance call was made to police. Although the crown did not initially agree to withdraw the charge, I convinced them that it was not in the public interest to prosecute. On that basis, the crown withdrew the charge.

R. v. M.L., 2018

The client was charged with assault in relation to a road rage allegation. The matter was a serious one, but the crown agreed to refer the client to a diversion program. Once completed, the charge was dropped. It was extremely important to the client’s employment that there be no conviction. I was able to achieve that goal for the client.

R. v. C.K., 2018

The client was charged with assault against their domestic partner. The allegation was a serious one. A conviction for the client would have meant issues with future employment. After discussions with the crown, the matter was withdrawn, and the client entered into a one-year peace bond.

R. v. O.O., 2018

The client was charged with assault causing bodily harm in relation to a sporting event. The allegation was serious in that the complainant received a serious injury that required stitches. I met with the crown to propose a reduction of the charge to a simple assault charge, to be referred to the Alternative Measures Program. The client completed the requirements of the program, and the charge was dropped entirely.

R. v. T.B., 2018

The client was charged with assault and uttering threats. After discussions with the crown, the charges were withdrawn entirely as there was no reasonable likelihood of conviction.

R. v. D.L., 2018

The client was charged with assault with a weapon. Initially, the prosecutor was not agreeable to resolution of the matter without a guilty plea and a conviction. After several negotiations with the crown, I managed to have the crown agree to withdraw the charge, and the client entered into a peace bond with minimal conditions. The charge was dropped. No conviction was entered.

R. v. C.F., 2018

The client was charged with assault, assault with a weapon, forcible confinement, uttering threats, careless use of a firearm, unauthorized possession of a firearm, possessing a firearm contrary to a prohibition order, sexual assault and mischief. Initially the matter was set down for trial after a not guilty plea was entered. At the first trial date, I filed a notice alleging a breach of my client’s rights. On the basis of that, a new trial date was set. Prior to second trial date, I filed yet another notice that related to breaches of my client’s rights due to the lack of disclosure. Two days prior to the start of the second trial date, the crown stayed the charges. The matter was concluded. All of the charges were dropped.

R. v. M.L., 2018

The client was originally charged with assault causing bodily harm and failing to comply with release conditions. The charges were eventually upgraded to the far more serious charge of aggravated assault due to the extensive injuries the complainant received. In the end, the crown stayed (dropped) both charges. The matter was thus concluded without the client having any conviction or criminal record which would have had a serious impact upon the client’s immigration status.

R. v. D.G., 2018

The client was charged with assault in relation to the client’s domestic partner. The crown would not agree to resolving the matter so that the client did not have a criminal record. However, I had the client participate in multiple forms of counselling and treatment, and in the end, the crown agreed to withdraw the charges entirely.

R. v. V.C., 2018

The client was charged with breaching the conditions of a peace bond that was originally in place after an allegation of domestic assault. Despite the crown’s initial position that the client should receive a conviction, I was able to negotiate a resolution for an additional shorter-term peace bond so that the client avoided a criminal conviction.

R. v. L.W., 2018

The client was charged with administering a noxious substance and failing to provide the necessaries of life to a child under the age of 16. The matter was set for trial. After we thoroughly prepared for trial, the crown elected to drop all of the charges.

R. v. G.E., 2018

The client was charged with criminal harassment involving a former domestic partner. These were false allegations against the client. I prepared for a trial of the matter, and upon seeing the evidence relating to the defence of my client, the crown withdrew the charges.